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May

2007

How About Them Apples Vicky Toensing?
Wednesday, 30 May 2007 11:10
by Larry C Johnson

Victoria Toensing, Cliff May, Byron York and the other rightwing apologists who have long insisted that Valerie Plame Wilson was not undercover have some "splaining" to do. Federal Prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald's latest filing in the Scooter Libby case leaves no doubt about Valerie Wilson's status — she was covert and undercover and served overseas. Thanks to a heads up from McClatchy's Jonathan Landay, followed in short order by a note from John Amato at Crooks and Liars, I got my hands on the Fitzgerald filing. Man, the rightwing stooges are getting their collective asses handed to them on all fronts (e.g., a bird shits on Bush, Wolfowitz gets bounced from the World Bank, and rightwing bloggers, Flopping Aces and Charles Johnson in particular, were exposed making fraudulent claims). As Jackie Gleason used to say, "how sweet it is!"

Download fitz_filing_declaring_val_was_undercover.pdf

Fitz makes the following points:
  1. Valerie Wilson was an operations officer working in the Counter Proliferation Division (CPD) of the Directorate of Operations and headed a unit that covered weapons proliferation issues concerning Iraq.
  2. While in CPD Valerie traveled overseas seven times to more than ten countries always, repeat always, undercover.
  3. Valerie was a covert officer on 14 July 2003, when Novak identified her as a CIA employee.
  4. The CIA was taking "affirmative measures to conceal her intelligence relationship to the United States."
So far the CIA will only admit that Valerie worked there starting in January 2002. But those of us who trained with her know the truth — Valerie was undercover and covered by the Intelligence Indentities Protection Act since September 1985. According to the Intelligence Identities Protection Act:

(4) The term “covert agent” means: (A) a present or retired officer or employee of an intelligence agency or a present or retired member of the Armed Forces assigned to duty with an intelligence agency—
(i) whose identity as such an officer, employee, or member is classified information, and (ii) who is serving outside the United States or has within the last five years served outside the United States; or

(B) a United States citizen whose intelligence relationship to the United States is classified information, and—

(i) who resides and acts outside the United States as an agent of, or informant or source of operational assistance to, an intelligence agency, or (ii) who is at the time of the disclosure acting as an agent of, or informant to, the foreign counterintelligence or foreign counterterrorism components of the Federal Bureau of Investigation; or (C) an individual, other than a United States citizen, whose past or present intelligence relationship to the United States is classified information and who is a present or former agent of, or a present or former informant or source of operational assistance to, an intelligence agency.
Oh! Let's not forget Mr. Lewis "Scooter" Libby. He's going to jail because he obstructed justice and perjured himself. He deserves to be tried for treason, but, as Mick Jagger sang, "you can't always get what you want. But you find sometimes, you get what you need."

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a guest said:

0
Greenwald....
Fred Barnes, Fox News Special Report, November 3, 2005 (via Lexis):

The CIA made such a big deal out of Valerie Plame and her name being published. She wasn't even an covert agent or anything.


Fred Barnes, July 17, 2005 - Fox News roundtable (via Lexis):

Well, wait a minute, though. I mean, look, if they were really pushing this case, really trying to get her name out and discredit and disclose that she was a CIA agent, really out her -- and I don't think she was a covert agent. She worked at a desk in Langley at CIA headquarters.


Mark Levin, National Review, July 18, 2005:

Despite all the hype, it appears that Plame works a desk job at the CIA. That's an admirable and important line of work. But it doesn't make her a covert operative, and it didn't make her a covert operative when Bob Novak mentioned her in his July 14, 2003, column, or the five years preceding the column's publication, during which time she hadn't served overseas as a spy, either.


Washington Times Editorial, July 19, 2005:

What is known thus far suggests that . . . In July 2003, when columnist Robert Novak first mentioned in passing that Mrs. Plame worked for the CIA, she was not functioning as a covert agent and her work for the CIA was common knowledge.

Glenn "Instapundit" Reynolds, July 15, 2005:

Since it seems as clear as anything in this affair that Valerie Plame was not a covert agent the day before Novak's column either, I think we can chalk this up to Joe Wilson's habitual disingenuousness. . .

Rich Galen, Republican strategist, CNN's Situation Room, October 6, 2005 (via Lexis):

GALEN: At the time she was not undercover. She was not a covert -- and we call them officers, not agents. . . We're arguing whether or not she was a covert agent at the time and I'm saying she was not.

Alexander Haig, CNN, October 30, 2005 (via Lexis):

Now, let me tell you, he didn't lay a finger on anyone about a conspiracy associated with the war, or about an effort to get the so -- called State Department official's wife, who was really a bureaucrat and not a covert operator.

John Hinderaker Powerline, November 5, 2005:

When CIA leaks hurt the administration, these papers have gleefully passed them on. It was only when Scooter Libby mentioned the name of a non-covert CIA employee, Valerie Plame, that the Post, the Times, and other MSM outlets suddenly developed a faux concern about lapses in security.

Barbara Lerner, National Review, March 19, 2007:

The charge was false, and the CIA knew it was false from the get-go. Valerie Plame was their employee; they knew she was not a classified agent because she was not covert and had not worked abroad for more than five years.

Robert Novak, CNN's Crossfire, September 29, 2003 (via Lexis):

According to a confidential source at the CIA, Mrs. Wilson was an analyst, not a spy, not a covert operative, and not in charge of undercover operatives. So what is the fuss about? Pure Bush-bashing.

Fox "moderate" Mort Kondracke, Special Report with Brit Hume, September 1, 2006 (via Lexis):

I don't think we know that Karl Rove knew and I assume that Scooter Libby may have known but he may have -- you know, she was not a covert officer, she was not a covert agent, and she was not covered by the intelligence agent's identities act. So, all of that is beside the point.

Laura Ingraham, Hannity & Colmes, March 7, 2007:

This is bizarre that this case would have gone this far when they knew who leaked this information, and they knew that this was not a situation where Valerie Plame, at this point in time, at least, was a covert agent.

David Rifkin & Lee Casey, National Review, January 25, 2007:

First and foremost, based on information in Wilson's book, among other places, it became abundantly clear that Valerie Plame was not a covert agent, but an official based in Langley whose identity was well-known around town.

Jonah Goldberg, National Review Corner, September 30, 2003:

Wilson's wife is a desk jockey and much of the Washington cocktail circuit knew that already.

In February of this year, Tony Snow chatted with Bill O'Reilly and said this (h/t Zack):

Very quickly -- very quickly, you got this Valerie Plame case. Now, it turns out that Peter (sic: Patrick) Fitzgerald doesn't -- can't even identify any harm. She wasn't a covert agent. She wasn't compromised. . . She wasn't covert anymore.
 
May 30, 2007
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