Home     Writers     Op/Ed     Book Reviews     News     Bookstore     Photoshops     Submit     Search     Contact Us     Advertise  
  You are here: 

Wed

10

Jan

2007

Litvinenko. And Londongrad’s New ‘Sushi Suits’
Wednesday, 10 January 2007 13:01
by Copydude

gagarin2As yet more London restaurants and hotels are found contaminated with Polonium 210, murder isn’t most likely.

The amount of Polonium needed to leave a month long trail over three countries, four hotels, assorted homes, offices and eateries - not to mention Arsenal football stadium - is simply too much for a simple poisoning.

Especially when any amount over a speck of dust is overkill.

British police aren’t using the phrase ‘dirty bomb’ yet but it’s clear they’re thinking about one. The UK Daily Pundit details their recent shopping list.

As you can see, Escape Hoods and Protective Suits were hurriedly commissioned at the height of the Litvinenko affair in December. Coincidence? Perhaps, but Scotland Yard was certainly shamed when its own investigators suffered contamination, while German officers had all the right gear.

Yet in the face of all evidence and logic, the media is still spinning the same tired script. The Daily Telegraph now believes Litvinenko was, quote, ‘attacked’ twice. Hmmm. Polonium is only 250 billion times deadlier than cyanide. The ‘assassins’ really thought they should slip him another one, just for luck? And considering Polonium only costs 10 million a shot, what the hell? Meanwhile, exactly how you attack someone with a speck of dust, the Telegraph can’t say.


Perfectly reasonable, however, that Litvinenko became poisoned over a period of time - like Mme Curie herself - from handling the radioactive substance. Only in Sasha’s case, as an arms smuggler.

Mainstream reporting on this case beggars belief. A prime example: during October and November, Scaramella flew from Naples to London. Litvinenko flew from Israel to London. Goldfarb flew from the US to London. Lugovoi flew from Moscow to London, Kovtun from Hamburg to London. Up to 20 sites in London are contaminated. Yet the media runs the headline, ‘The Trail Leads to Moscow‘. Go figure?

Alexander Litvininko will go down in history for being the first person to call a PR agency to handle his death. But the media smokescreen hasn’t blown entirely from Bell disinfo. MI6 has been very busy briefing too, through Oleg Gordievsky, Britain’s favourite traitor. (Wanna degree? Be a defector!)

Which still leaves the real question. What on earth were MI6, Berezovsky, Litvinenko and British mercenary firms doing with at least three planeloads of dirty bomb material?

You can’t tell me that Sasha ate the lot.
 
More from this author:
Mafia Hit On The Media (12678 Hits)
by John Weaver If I simply stood anywhere near Boris Berezovsky, I’m sure my hair would fall out and my skin would turn yellow. ...
Saint Sasha, The Toenail Puller (10308 Hits)
by John Weaver Tributes to Sasha Litvinenko, the sob story spy, are on all the tear-stained pages of the UK tabloids today. Probably the...
Litvinenko And Limonov (7007 Hits)
by John Weaver Since every British tabloid has linked the dissident Litvinenko with Politkovskaya, let’s link on... As it happens, both...
Get Putin (7003 Hits)
From Erinys website. Kalashnikovs for sale or rent. As Beatroot notes, the crescendo of Russophobia has climaxed into the international press...
The Spy Who Nuked Me (5637 Hits)
by Copy Dude Suddenly the whole Litvinenko business is looking more like Austin Powers than James Bond. Aha. ‘The Trail of Poison Leads...
Related Articles:
Exclusive: Earl Grey Killed Litvinenko. You Read It Here Last. (5886 Hits)
by Copydude By now, you’ve all read the latest crackpot teapot story. So without further ado, I’ve written to one of the hacks who...
Litvinenko. Britain’s Crown Cops Cop Out. (3939 Hits)
by Copydude Well fancy that. Britain’s Crown Prosecution Service would charge Lugovoi with the murder of Litvinenko. But since they...


Add this page to your favorite Social Bookmarking websites
Trackback(0)
Comments (5)add comment

Sidewaysglance said:

0
The killers did not know the poison was radioactive
Mr Copydude, if you had to handle a radioactive metal, would not you make sure that you had it as far from your own person as possible? You bet! The Russian trio have not. Which leaves pretty much one conclusion - they did not know it was radio active, which also rules out any funny theories about "dirty bombs". Who knew it then? Those who asked them to poison Litvinenko, of course. The funny thing is that poison was highly radioactive, so the killers would die their "natural" death at some point too.
 
January 10, 2007
Votes: +0

Copy Dude said:

Copy Dude
Good point, but . . .
It's a good point, but it doesn't necessarily prove an assassination.

It frequently occurs in smuggling that the 'mules' do not know the true nature - and most of all, true value - of the contraband.

It remains that the multiple consignments, players, journeys and locations point away from a simple assassination, which could have been accomplished by one person in one hit.

'Sidewaysglance' wrote: 'The killers would die their natural death too'. Eventually perhaps. But not without leaving them alive long enough to cause problems, identify the 'lead assassin' and instigate revenge. It's just one of many reasons why Polonium would never be chosen as a murder weapon and, not surprisingly, never has been in the past.
 
January 10, 2007
Votes: +0

a guest said:

0
Mark Adkins: confusion on timeline of radioactive traces
The London Times reported that:

"Traces of polonium-210 has been found at Parkes Hotel, Mayfair, it was confirmed last night. It means that radiation has been found at all three hotels where Mr Lugovoy had stayed since flying to London on October 16. The Parkes was the first he stayed at."

"The radioactive isotope has also been found at Risc Management, a security firm in Cavendish Place, visited by Litvinenko with Mr Lugovoy and Mr Kovtun on October 17."

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-2493244,00.html#cid=OTC-RSS&attr=Britain

Now, so far as I am aware, Litvenenko did not visit the Parkes Hotel on Nov. 1; if he was poisoned on Nov. 1 then he cannot have left these radioactive traces.

At the same time, it beggars the imagination to suggests that Lugovoi was knowingly running around carrying polonium everywhere he went, from mid-October onward, meeting with Litvenenko multiple times, until finally deciding to poison him on 1 November. Furthermore, if this is the case, it cannot have been the case that the polonium was brought into Britain only a few days before November 1 in anticipation of the meeting with Litvenenko.




 
January 12, 2007
Votes: +0

Copy Dude said:

Copy Dude
...
Yes, the assassination theory is full of holes.

Unfortunately, no one has reported in precisely what form the Polonium was transported. It's a metal, but apparently can be dissolved, crystallised and is easily aerosolised. It is also reported to be 'leaky'. It looks as if the Health Protection Agency has changed its mind on advice too, since the original Press Release suggested that it could be 'easily washed off' and 'can't pass through skin or a paper bag'.

It looks as if there were significant quantities in several consignments and that some people received multiple exposures over time.
 
January 13, 2007
Votes: +0

a guest said:

0
Mark Adkins: another theory?
There is one piece of the puzzle which, though receiving a little coverage,
seems to have disappeared from the radar scope. None of the theories I
have seen to date incorporate it.

It was reported that the Russian security service uses (or has used)
polonium to track/trace currency. Obviously, if true, the amounts used
would be tiny compared to the amount which Litvenenko is said to have
absorbed. But is the Russian security service infallible in this
regard? What if currency became contaminated accidentally with a
significantly larger amount? Who would know, at least until a later
date when the lab supply was found to be missing an unaccounted for
quantity? After all, even the amount absorbed by Litvenenko was
virtually microscopic. (And neither the lab workers/managers nor their
political masters would be eager to report such an absence.)

Now, Lugovoi was associating with a number of elements of interest to
the Russian security service, including Litvenenko, but also
Berezovsky, foreign private intelligence firms, and others. Litvenenko
was, by some reports, hard-up for money, or at least eager to obtain
it. It is not incredible to speculate that money passed from Lugovoi
to Litvenenko, perhaps on more than one occasion during their multiple
meetings, including on November 1. And the Russian security service
may have been keeping tabs on Lugovoi and (more particularly) on his
contacts among the Russian and/or Chechen expatriates of London, using
money traceable in this fashion.

This would explain why Lugovoi was a walking distributor of polonium
traces for so long. The stuff is known to spread itself about if not
kept under strict control. Molecules of the polonium used to salt the
currency would "crawl" over it, so that anyone handling it would become
contaminated (and thence could contaminate others); but only the one
who touched the currency on the tiny spot containing the originally
applied bit of polonium would get the excessive amount on his hands.

This could even explain how Litvenenko reportedly had two poisoning
"spikes" in his absorption spectra (one relatively small and one
relatively large). One can imagine Litvinenko handling and counting
this money. And once on his hands, it could easily be orally
introduced into his body.

So, it might even turn out that the Russians ARE responsible -- but for
an accident, not murder. This would also explain why such an expensive
murder weapon was used (reportedly $20 million U.S. worth) as well as
why someone would use 100 times the lethal dose of such an expensive
substance. It would also explain why Russia -- which produces 97% of
the world polonium supply according to one report -- would use
something which points so obviously in its direction. The object was
surveillance intelligence, not a splashy international murder story,
breaking at a delicate time and ruining world summit meetings between
Putin and other world leaders.

Well, just an idea...Full of holes?
 
January 16, 2007
Votes: +0

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

adsense

Top